Testing Identifying Assumptions in Bivariate Probit Models

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2021-03-29
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Kedagni, Desire
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Bartalotti, Otávio
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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This paper focuses on the bivariate probit model's identifying
assumptions: joint normality of errors, instrument exogeneity, and relevance conditions. First, we develop novel sharp testable equalities that can detect all possible observable violations of the assumptions. Second, we propose an easy-to-implement testing procedure for the model's validity based on feasible testable implications using existing inference methods for intersection bounds. The test achieves correct empirical size for moderately sized samples and performs well in detecting violations of the conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we provide researchers with a road map on what to do when the bivariate probit model is rejected, including novel bounds for the average treatment effect that relax the normality assumption. Empirical examples illustrate the methodology's implementation.

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