Maize (Zea mays L.) kernel development, suitability for dry-grind ethanol production, and susceptibility to aflatoxin accumulation in relation to late-season water stress

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2008-01-01
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Haegele, Jason
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Mark Westgate
Charles Hurburgh
Jay-lin Jane
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

Worldwide, water stress during vegetative and reproductive development of cereal species is a primary constraint to crop yield. In maize ( Zea mays L.), environmental stresses such as high temperature and drought affect yield by reducing the number and mean dry weight of harvested seeds per unit area. Total grain yield is of great economic concern, and increasing yield under optimal and stress conditions has historically received the most attention by public and private breeding programs. But environmental effects on grain quality is of equal importance as maize production becomes more focused on end-user traits specifically for utilization in markets such as dry-grind ethanol, wet-milling, and enhanced animal feeds. While these traits have demonstrated great economic potential, the variability in their corresponding properties as a result of adverse environmental conditions during grain development is not well understood. Further development and utilization of valuable enduser traits will require a greater understanding of kernel development and composition during environmental stress.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2008