Neoliberal effects as seen in village health dispensaries within the Kedougou Region of Southeast Senegal

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2018-01-01
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Salter, Samantha
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Nell Gabiam
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Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology seeks to teach students what it means to be human by examining the four sub-disciplines of anthropology: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and biological anthropology. This prepares students for work in academia, research, or with government agencies, development organizations, museums, or private businesses and corporations.

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The Department of Anthropology was formed in 1991 as a result of the division of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

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1991-present

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My research lead me to the Kedougou Region of southeastern Senegal, a rural area struggling for accessible healthcare. This paper explores how neoliberal health reforms have negatively affected access to quality health care in rural Senegal. I used ethnographic research methods, such as in person interviews and participant observation during my fieldwork in Senegal from May through August 2017. In analyzing my interview and observation data, I applied a localist, semi-structured approach and utilized a critical ethnographic perspective. Over 2-months worth of observations and 15 interviews yielded data that illustrates the lasting effects of neoliberal economic reforms from 30 years ago in Senegal. These enduring effects are seen in independent village dispensaries in how they are able to provide basic health services and how community members are able to access those services. This paper tells the story of community members and health workers in their struggle to receive and provide sustainable health care.

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Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018