The power of geographical boundaries: Cultural, political, and economic border effects in a unitary nation

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2010-01-01
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Chang, Bowon
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Robert Urbatsch
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Political Science
The Department of Political Science has been a separate department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (formerly the College of Sciences and Humanities) since 1969 and offers an undergraduate degree (B.A.) in political science, a graduate degree (M.A.) in political science, a joint J.D./M.A. degree with Drake University, an interdisciplinary degree in cyber security, and a graduate Certificate of Public Management (CPM). In addition, it provides an array of service courses for students in other majors and other colleges to satisfy general education requirements in the area of the social sciences.
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Geography plays a significant, fundamental role in shaping outcomes in human societies. Among other geographical elements, borders have significant implications—they are not only geographical figures, but also political creatures. Against previous theories that have studied border effects along with institutional differences mostly about economic implications, this thesis considers how sub-national borders with weak jurisdictions affect cultural, political, and economic phenomena using data from South Korea. Unlike international borders and intra-national borders in a federal state, this thesis suggests borders in a unitary nation have less economic effects, but more cultural and political effects.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2010