Efficacy of Two Nutrition Education Methods for Older Adults in an Independent Living Community

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Date
2016-04-01
Authors
Scheuermann, Kaitlyn
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Honors Projects and Posters
University Honors Program

The Honors project is potentially the most valuable component of an Honors education. Typically Honors students choose to do their projects in their area of study, but some will pick a topic of interest unrelated to their major.

The Honors Program requires that the project be presented at a poster presentation event. Poster presentations are held each semester. Most students present during their senior year, but may do so earlier if their honors project has been completed.

This site presents project descriptions and selected posters for Honors projects completed since the Fall 2015 semester.

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Food Science & Human Nutrition
Abstract

Older adults are a diverse population with many life experiences. Food is an important part of their lives from cultural and physiological perspectives. As adults age, food and physical activity can promote better health and quality of life. This study took place in an independent living facility. Independent living facility residents live in their own apartments where they cook their own meals and choose their own physical activity. Two methods of nutrition education, in-person and online lessons, were used to discuss key areas of concern for older adults: meal planning, physical activity, protein, and produce consumption. Participants completed interviews to gather perspectives on their community and perceptions of food and nutrition. These results determined topics of interest. Participants also completed the Dietary Screening Tool at the beginning (pre-) and end (post-) of the educational series to assess changes in dietary intake frequency and nutritional risk. Participants were divided into two groups to complete nutrition education in one of the formats. Participants completed post-pre questionnaires to assess self-reported change in familiarity and intention to change. Results were not significant due to a small, non-diverse sample. However, the results suggested a shift toward higher familiarity and likelihood to apply changes.

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