Healthy Food as a New Technology—The Implications of Technological Diffusion and Food Price for Changes in Eating Habits

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2018-11-01
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Dohmen, Anne
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Raman, D. Raj
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Diet influences health and poor diets drive up healthcare costs for individuals and society as a whole. Multiple governmental programs in the US have aimed to educate citizens about diet choices, resulting in documented successes, as well as, unintended consequences such as increased food waste. Here we examine some of the relationships between healthy diets, food prices, and wealth by drawing parallels between the diffusion of technological innovation and healthy food diets. We introduce a simple modeling framework to estimate the adoption rates of healthy diets based on income and food prices, and describe the implications of the modeling results for the food industry and for government.

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This article is published as Dohmen, Anne E., and D. Raj Raman. "Healthy food as a New Technology–the implications of technological diffusion and food price for changes in eating habits." Frontiers in Nutrition 5 (2018): 109. DOI: 10.3389/fnut.2018.00109. Posted with permission.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018
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