A Preliminary Analysis of the Proposed 1998 Taxpayers' Right Amendments to the Iowa Constitution and Fiscal Consequences Assuming Implementation from FY1984 to Present

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1998-03-03
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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This staff paper-reviews the Senate (SSB2072) anU House (HSB688) versions of'a proposed 1998 Amendment.to the Iowa Constitution and.provides a preliminary analysis of the fiscal impacts'on the,state general fund receipts, general fund appropriations, and local property^taxes assuming each proposal was implemented in FY1984. While the year-to-year reductions in spending are relatively small,the cumulative fiscal impact of the SSB2072 would likely have resulted in (1) a FY1997 state general-fund limit that allows 32 percent less spending'than•actual FY1997, (2) a $710-million reduction in the growth of state aid-to local government; and (3)'a29.7 percent increase in property taxes, if property taxes;were used,to fully replace: the reduction in-growth of state aid to local governments.

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