Entry under placement uncertainty

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Date
2023-08-07
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Roy, Sunanda
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Singh, Rajesh
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Weninger, Quinn
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract
We present a model of firm entry in an industry that operates under an aggregate production quota or cap-and-trade (CAT) regulation. Firms are heterogeneous in their own productivity; each knows its costs of production but is uncertain about where its costs rank among an entrant population. We show the existence of a unique, symmetric, dominance solvable, Bayesian Nash equilibrium in switching strategies in a parameterized game with a continuum of players. Our main result is that uncertainty over one’s productivity rank is sufficient to cause socially inefficient over-entry when the average cost in the population of potential entrants is low. We find socially inefficient under-entry when the opposite conditions hold. Within both the class of models on global games with strategic substitutes and the class of models on firm entry, our model offers innovative insights into inefficient over-entry, under-entry, and introduces a novel underlying mechanism that drives entry bias.
Comments
JEL Classification: L2, C72, Q58
Length: 65 pages
Original Release Date: January 31, 2020
Revisions: February 20, 2021; February 24, 2021; May 28, 2022
Latest Revision: August 7, 2023
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