Internal structural loading of the lower extremity during running: Implications for skeletal injury

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2009-01-01
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Edwards, William
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Timothy R. Derrick
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Kinesiology
The Department of Kinesiology seeks to provide an ample knowledge of physical activity and active living to students both within and outside of the program; by providing knowledge of the role of movement and physical activity throughout the lifespan, it seeks to improve the lives of all members of the community. Its options for students enrolled in the department include: Athletic Training; Community and Public Health; Exercise Sciences; Pre-Health Professions; and Physical Education Teacher Licensure. The Department of Physical Education was founded in 1974 from the merger of the Department of Physical Education for Men and the Department of Physical Education for Women. In 1981 its name changed to the Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies. In 1993 its name changed to the Department of Health and Human Performance. In 2007 its name changed to the Department of Kinesiology. Dates of Existence: 1974-present. Historical Names: Department of Physical Education (1974-1981), Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies (1981-1993), Department of Health and Human Performance (1993-2007). Related Units: College of Human Sciences (parent college), College of Education (parent college, 1974 - 2005), Department of Physical Education for Women (predecessor) Department of Physical Education for Men
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Running is a popular activity of choice for many, and a necessity for athletes and military personnel. The positive physiological adaptations associated with running are well established, and these adaptations can only be exploited if runners remain free from overuse injury. This dissertation utilized a combination of experimentation, musculoskeletal modeling, and a probabilistic model of bone damage, repair, and adaptation to investigate internal structural loading of the lower extremity during running. Specific emphasis was placed on stress fracture development, a common overuse injury that results, in part, from the mechanical fatigue of bone. A series of studies were conducted that addressed the influence of speed on lower-extremity contact forces during running, the relationship between internal femoral loads and stress fracture development, and changes in the probability of tibial stress fracture with practical alterations in kinematics and running mileage. The findings of these studies can be summarized as follows: 1) musculoskeletal models provide meaningful non-invasive estimations of internal structural loads in healthy young adults; 2) joint contact forces increase with speed, 3) stress fractures tend to occur at femoral locations experiencing the largest mechanical loads; 4) the probability of tibial stress fracture increases with stride length and running mileage for a given speed; and 5) the probability of tibial stress fracture increases with running speed for a given mileage. Ultimately this information can be used to develop running regimens that maximize the positive adaptations associated with running and minimize the potential for overuse injury and stress fracture development.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009