Visual Understanding: The Ethics of Architectural Representation

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2000-10-11
Authors
Palermo, Gregory
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Architecture

The Department offers a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The program provides opportunities for general education as well as preparation for professional practice and/or graduate study.

The Department of Architecture offers two graduate degrees in architecture: a three-year accredited professional degree (MArch) and a two-semester to three-semester research degree (MS in Arch). Double-degree programs are currently offered with the Department of Community and Regional Planning (MArch/MCRP) and the College of Business (MArch/MBA).

History
The Department of Architecture was established in 1914 as the Department of Structural Design in the College of Engineering. The name of the department was changed to the Department of Architectural Engineering in 1918. In 1945, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering. In 1967, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and formed part of the Design Center. In 1978, the department became part of the College of Design.

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1914–present

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  • Department of Structural Design (1914–1918)
  • Department of Architectural Engineering (1918–1945)
  • Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering (1945–1967)

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Abstract

Architectural representation’s multiple purposes include serving as working method for the architect and as communication to others. It is in communicating proposals to others that ethics issues arise. At stake are: satisfying values, meeting expectations, ‘reading’ architecture in one’s imagination, and enabling decision making. The first ethical requisite is teleological virtue: mastering the practices of representation. The second is that of deontic obligation to accurately portray design schemes to non-architects to enable the highest degree of understanding. Virtue concepts from Vitruvius to CAD, and case examples from Piranesi to Lebbeus Woods and the New Urbanists are explored.

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This is a proceedings from Exploring the Visual Future: Art Design, Science & Technology, Selected Readings from the 32nd International Visual Literacy Association Conference, 0ctober 11-14, 2000; 369-376. Posted with permission.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2000