Influences on study abroad students’ intrapersonal development

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2021-05
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Miner, Shannon Louise
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Gansemer-Topf, Ann
Shelley, Mack
Englin, Peter
Brumm, Thomas
Reason, Robert
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Education, School of
Abstract
Study abroad has been seen as a pathway to global competencies that will prepare students to be citizens of a global and interconnected world. Intrapersonal development is a dimension of global perspective important to consider as it reflects individuals’ perceptions, awareness, respect, and acceptance of their own identity as well as others who are different. This multi-institution quantitative study of 1,075 undergraduates from 39 U.S. institutions explored influences on study abroad participants’ intrapersonal development through intrapersonal identity and affect as measured by the Global Perspectives Inventory (GPI). Astin’s I-E-O model was used as a conceptual framework to investigate the influences of students’ characteristics, experiences on campus and abroad, and institution characteristics on intrapersonal identity and affect. Analysis of data collected from the GPI General, GPI Study Abroad forms, and IPEDS included descriptive statistics, multiple regression, logistic regression, and discriminant analysis. Results indicate that aspects of students’ characteristics, experiences on campus and abroad, and institution characteristics influence intrapersonal identity and affect before and after study abroad. Additionally, study abroad participants generally had higher intrapersonal identity and affect scores after their experiences abroad. Implications for institutions and international educators are outlined and discussed.
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