The effects of gender and status on power strategy use

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1990
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Nelson, Robin
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Meg Gerrard
Rick Gibbons
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Altmetrics
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Psychology
The Department of Psychology may prepare students with a liberal study, or for work in academia or professional education for law or health-services. Graduates will be able to apply the scientific method to human behavior and mental processes, as well as have ample knowledge of psychological theory and method.
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The present study examined the effects of gender and status on self-reported likelihood of power strategy use. Female and male subjects reported the likelihood of their taking each of 24 actions in order to influence a male or female target of lower, equal or higher status. Subjects also rated the perceived effectiveness and desirability of each of the influence tactics. Based upon Falbo and Peplau's two-dimensional model (1980), four types of power strategies were identified: bilateral, unilateral, direct and indirect. As predicted, persons of lower status were more likely to be the recipients of direct strategies than persons of higher status. Lower status targets were also more likely to be the recipients of unilateral strategies than higher status targets, but only when the target person was male. Overall, the effects of status of the target were more salient and consistent than effects due to gender of target. Gender of subject had little effect on likelihood of power strategy use;Reference. Falbo, T., & Peplau, L. A. (1980). Power strategies in intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 618-628.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1990