The Difference between PC-Based and Immersive Virtual Reality Food Purchase Environments on Useability, Presence, and Physiological Responses

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2024-01-09
Authors
Woodall, Shelley
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MDPI
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Food Science and Human Nutrition
Abstract
Computer simulations used to study food purchasing behavior can be separated into low immersion virtual environments (LIVE), which use personal computers and standard monitors to display a scene, and high immersion virtual environments (HIVE) which use virtual reality technology such as head-mounted displays to display a scene. These methods may differ in their ability to create feelings of presence or cybersickness that would influence the usefulness of these approaches. In this present study, thirty-one adults experienced a virtual supermarket or fast-food restaurant using a LIVE system or a HIVE system. Feelings of presence and cybersickness were measured using questionnaires or physiological responses (heart rate and electrodermal activity). The participants were also asked to rate their ability to complete the set task. The results of this study indicate that participants reported a higher sense of presence in the HIVE scenes as compared to the LIVE scenes (p < 0.05). The participant’s heart rate and electrodermal activity were significantly higher in the HIVE scene treatment when compared to the LIVE scene (p < 0.05). There was no difference in the participant’s ability to complete tasks in the different scenes. In addition, feelings of cybersickness were not different between the HIVE and LIVE scenes.
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This article is published as Woodall S, Hollis JH. The Difference between PC-Based and Immersive Virtual Reality Food Purchase Environments on Useability, Presence, and Physiological Responses. Foods. 2024; 13(2):264. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020264. Posted with permission.
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