Radio counterparts of galactic gamma-ray sources

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1984
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Andrews, Michael
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Physics and Astronomy
Physics and astronomy are basic natural sciences which attempt to describe and provide an understanding of both our world and our universe. Physics serves as the underpinning of many different disciplines including the other natural sciences and technological areas.
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Satellite observations, in particular those of the COS-B group, have led to the discovery of galactic gamma-ray sources. The identified sources have clear radio counterparts and it is plausible that the unidentified sources may be detected and identified by radio observations. The radiation mechanisms which are separately responsible for the emission of gamma-rays and radio waves are presented with an emphasis on the basic physics of the processes. The astrophysical systems which have been considered as gamma-ray sources and the radio emission which is expected from the existing models are discussed. VLA observations to investigate a possible connection of the W28 supernova remnant with the gamma-ray source 2CG006-00 have uncovered a thermal source with a unique morphology that is positionally coincident with the remnant's center. A specific radio source in the field of 2CG353+16 has been investigated and found not to be the radio counterpart of the gamma-ray source. The existing radio data from the Master Source List for the twenty-two fields containing the unidentified COS-B sources are presented, discussed, and the hypothesis offered that eleven of the sources may be molecular clouds irradiated by cosmic-rays.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1984