Assessing Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emissions of Two Local Food Distribution Options in Iowa

dc.contributor.author Pirog, Rich
dc.contributor.author Rasmussen, Rebecca
dc.contributor.department Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture
dc.date 2018-02-17T12:57:57.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T05:52:58Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T05:52:58Z
dc.date.embargo 2016-02-09
dc.date.issued 2008-06-01
dc.description.abstract <p>The purpose of this study was to determine which transportation option consumed less fuel and emitted less CO 2 : farmer delivery or customer pick-up of food products for an Iowa Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) enterprise.</p> <p>In order to perform this study, the following information was obtained from an Iowa CSA farmer: his exact route(s) of delivery (including customers’ addresses), what type of vehicle he used for deliveries, and what location and time of day he would utilize as a central pick-up point for customers if he chose not to deliver. With this information, the farmer’s route mileage was calculated us ing Mapquest and data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to determine fuel usage and vehicle emissions. The fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions were determined for four different vehicle categories: Ford Ranger, Dodge Caravan, Toyota Prius, and U. S. average fuel economy for passenger vehicles. Mileage, fuel consumption, and CO 2 emissions also were calculated for customer pick-up using the same method, categories, and references as used for the delivery method. Assumptions were made concerning the pick -up routes of customers depending upon their place of employment and deta ils provided by the CSA farmer.</p> <p>Findings showed that the delivery option using a Toyota Prius resulted in 2.77 times lower fuel usage and CO 2 emissions than the consumer pick-up option using U. S. average fuel economy for passenger vehicles. However, if all the CSA customers who used vehicles for pick-up drove a Toyota Prius, farmer distribution would still be more fuel efficient, but only 1.35 times more than that of customer pick-up.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/leopold_pubspapers/125/
dc.identifier.articleid 1120
dc.identifier.contextkey 8119709
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath leopold_pubspapers/125
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/53590
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/leopold_pubspapers/125/2008_06_assessing_fuel_efficiency_and_co2_emissions_two_local_food_distribution_options_iowa.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 19:23:00 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Agriculture
dc.subject.disciplines Environmental Indicators and Impact Assessment
dc.subject.disciplines Oil, Gas, and Energy
dc.title Assessing Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emissions of Two Local Food Distribution Options in Iowa
dc.type article
dc.type.genre report
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 88291ed1-41b3-483d-a829-877aee2e3d1d
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