The effect of information redundancy and format upon comprehensibility of consent information to chronic alcoholics

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1992
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Mills, Kenneth
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Douglas L. Epperson
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Psychology
The Department of Psychology may prepare students with a liberal study, or for work in academia or professional education for law or health-services. Graduates will be able to apply the scientific method to human behavior and mental processes, as well as have ample knowledge of psychological theory and method.
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This study investigated the effect of information repetition and media format upon comprehension and recall of consent information in a sample of chronic alcoholics. Subjects were 80 patients in treatment for chronic alcoholism in one of five treatment centers in the state of Iowa;Information about the study, itself, was presented to subjects in either printed or video format. Half of the subjects were presented each element of salient information only once (simple condition). The other half of the subjects were presented a reworded version of each element of salient information immediately following the initial presentation of the element (redundant condition);Analyses of variance were used to determine the effect upon comprehension of the independent variables. Relationships between several other variables and information comprehension were also examined, through the use of several statistical procedures;The findings did not support the effectiveness of redundant information presentation to increase comprehension of consent material in the sampled population. Neither did they support the effectiveness of video format over print format in the presentation of consent information. No significant interactive effects were noted. A small, but significant, relationship between reading level and comprehension, regardless of format of presentation, was noted;The implications of these findings, including the equivalency of print and video format in the consent process, were discussed.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1992