Production and Use of Evolving Corn-Based Fuel Ethanol Coproducts in the U.S.

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2015-01-01
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Rosentrater, Kurt
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Rosentrater, Kurt
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Abstract

We face many challenges in our society, due especially to growing population pressures and increased economic mobility. These can result in increased demands for food, clothing, housing, and consumer goods. Additionally, there has been a growing need for energy during the last several decades, which historically has been met primarily by use of fossil fuels. In the U.S., transportation fuels generally account for about 1/3 of all energy consumed. Of this, about 90% comes from fossil sources. Between 1/2 and 2/3 of the total U.S. demand for petroleum has been met by imports during the last 30 years [1]. Many argue that this scenario is not sustainable in the long run, and other energy alternatives are needed. During 2005-2010, the U.S. experienced some of the highest growth rates ever seen in the domestic biofuels industry.

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This book chapter is from Biofuels - Status and Perspective, edited by Krzysztof Biernat (Rijeka, Croatia: InTech Open Access, 2015). Posted with permission.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2015
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