Measuring assessment and testing cultures at a Reseach I University in the College of Engineering

Thumbnail Image
Date
2000-01-01
Authors
Dieterich, Ann
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Education
Abstract

The purpose was to examine engineering faculty members' perceptions of the evaluation culture in their classroom. One hundred thirty-two tenured or tenure-track faculty (61.4 % response rate) responded to a survey about evaluation practices (purpose, target, method, context, communication, grading). Items were worded so that they reflected either behavioral or constructivist learning theories. Factor analysis of the survey items revealed two underlying dimensions, one reflecting a testing culture (behavioral) and one reflecting an assessment culture (constructivist). Scales reflecting the two dimensions were reliable (alpha for each = .81). The scales were negatively correlated (r = -.44). The mean culture scores were significantly different (testing = 3.15, assessment = 3.45) indicating greater adherence to a constructivist paradigm. No relationship was found between the culture scores and the faculty's (a) departmental affiliation, (b) number of years since receiving a Baccalaureate degree, or (c) number of years teaching in higher education. Assessment culture scores were positively correlated with (a) the number of assessment college courses taken for credit, r = .265, (b) number of semesters in an on-campus faculty development program, r = .264, and (c) number of other faculty development sessions, r = .224. Testing culture scores were negatively correlated with the same variables (r = -.159, -.220, and -.267 respectively.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Copyright
Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2000