Unleashing biocatalysis/chemical catalysis synergies for efficient biomass conversion

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2007-01-01
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Shanks, Brent
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Chemical and Biological Engineering

The function of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been to prepare students for the study and application of chemistry in industry. This focus has included preparation for employment in various industries as well as the development, design, and operation of equipment and processes within industry.Through the CBE Department, Iowa State University is nationally recognized for its initiatives in bioinformatics, biomaterials, bioproducts, metabolic/tissue engineering, multiphase computational fluid dynamics, advanced polymeric materials and nanostructured materials.

History
The Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1913 under the Department of Physics and Illuminating Engineering. From 1915 to 1931 it was jointly administered by the Divisions of Industrial Science and Engineering, and from 1931 onward it has been under the Division/College of Engineering. In 1928 it merged with Mining Engineering, and from 1973–1979 it merged with Nuclear Engineering. It became Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2005.

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1913 - present

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  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1913–1928)
  • Department of Chemical and Mining Engineering (1928–1957)
  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1957–1973, 1979–2005)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (2005–present)

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Abstract

The goal of incorporating renewable carbon into the fuel and chemical enterprise will most likely be successful when combined systems of biocatalysts and chemical catalysts are exploited. Significant efforts in the biocatalytic release of sugars from biomass are being pursued for subsequent use in fermentation. Two recent papers demonstrate an alternative approach to converting these sugars to a liquid fuel by using chemical catalysts.

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Reprinted (adapted) with permission from ACS Chemical Biology 2 (2007): 533, doi: 10.1021/cb7001522.Copyright 2007 American Chemical Society.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007
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