Improving Sexual Health Education by Examining Protective Factors against Sexual Assault

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2022-07-28
Authors
Robinson, Madeline L
Diggs, Olivia N
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© 2022 Taylor & francis group, llC
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Neppl, Tricia K
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

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1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Abstract
This study examined the content, timing, and perceived effectiveness of college student’s previous preschool-12th grade sexual health education and evaluated differences among those who had experienced sexual assault. 964 Midwestern university students completed an online survey recalling their prior sexual health education curriculum. First sexual assaults among students increased between eighth and ninth grade but occurred most frequently in college. Students who experienced sexual assault were also more likely to rate their programming as less effective than those in the non-assault category. Those who had experienced sexual assault reported lower rates of being taught about healthy relationships, good touch versus bad touch, communication during sexual encounters, and the definition of sexual assault. Additionally, receiving information about healthy relationships was associated with the nonoccurrence of sexual assault. Results suggest these four topics, especially healthy relationships, should be taught before the eighth grade to proactively establish protective factors against sexual assault which may be utilized into students’ young adulthood.
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This article is published as 4. Robinson, M.**, Diggs, O. N.**, & Neppl, T. K. (2022). Improving sexual health education: An examination of how curriculum differs for students who have experienced sexual assault. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues, and Ideas. 95(5);193-201. https://doi.org/10.1080/00098655.2022.2098223.
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