An Analysis of Average and Marginal Costs of Iowa School Districts

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Date
1988
Authors
Kliebenstein, James
Walker, Kevin
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Animal health issues have been receiving increased attention both domestically and internationally. Moreover, the issues are not simply healthy or unhealthy animals, presence or absence of disease, or complete or partial control, The answers are not easy nor simple. It is not easy nor control is best or prevention is best. For every producer, for every species, for every dis ease, there can be a different level of control strategy which is best. The complexity of animal health comes from the fact that it usually interfaces with a variety of livestock species. Additionally, livestock production systems are quite diverse varying from the most rudimentary to highly sophisticated capital intensive confinement systems. Diseases too can result in a range of outcomes from only slight reductions in productivity to animal death. Level of management also impacts on animal disease levels. Its impact can be felt in such diverse spheres as international sales, producer profitability, and human health.

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