Corporate apology and cultural difference: A comparison of the United States and South Korea in cyber-security breach crisis

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2017-01-01
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Kim, Nahyun
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Suman Lee
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Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication
The Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication offers two majors: Advertising (instructing students in applied communication for work in business or industry), and Journalism and Mass Communication (instructing students in various aspects of news and information organizing, writing, editing, and presentation on various topics and in various platforms). The Department of Agricultural Journalism was formed in 1905 in the Division of Agriculture. In 1925 its name was changed to the Department of Technical Journalism. In 1969 its name changed to the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications; from 1969 to 1989 the department was directed by all four colleges, and in 1989 was placed under the direction of the College of Sciences and Humanities (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences). In 1998 its name was changed to the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication.
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The purpose of this study is to examine characteristics of apology (responsibility admittance, sympathetic expression, compensation, reassurance) and other features of crisis response such as use of excuses, function of apology, and organizational representation appearing in official statements when cyber-security breaches threaten an organizational reputation. Ultimately, 108 official statements issued by organizations in the United States and South Korea were analyzed through a quantitative content analysis. The results showed that (1) the most common type of data breach is identity theft, and almost all types of industry are exposed to the risk of data breach incidents; (2) internal security vulnerabilities including “malicious insider” and “accidental loss” are the second most frequent cause of cyber-security breaches; and (3) culture plays a significant role in the characteristics of apology (responsibility, sympathy, compensation, reassurance), use of excuse, function of apology, and organizational representation in official statements.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017