Long-Term Assessment of Miscanthus Productivity and Sustainability

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2017-01-01
Authors
Boersma, Nicholas
Tejera, Mauricio
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Heaton, Emily
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Extension and Experiment Station Publications
It can be very challenging to locate information about individual ISU Extension publications via the library website. Quick Search will list the name of the series, but it will not list individual publications within each series. The Parks Library Reference Collection has a List of Current Series, Serial Publications (Series Publications of Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service), published as of March 2004. It lists each publication from 1888-2004 (by title and publication number - and in some cases it will show an author name).
Organizational Unit
Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

Research has consistently shown Miscanthus × giganteus is among the most productive biomass crop options for the Midwestern U.S. However, because this perennial grass is a sterile hybrid, clonal propagation is required to establish new fields, which is achieved by digging and replanting rhizomes. Despite this challenge, and because of recent advances in planting technology, M. × giganteus production is economically competitive as a renewable solid fuel.

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