The myth of progress in the works of John Nichols

dc.contributor.author Hedberg, Steven
dc.contributor.department English
dc.date 2018-08-25T02:02:55.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T08:20:03Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T08:20:03Z
dc.date.copyright Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1980
dc.date.embargo 2013-03-05
dc.date.issued 1980
dc.description.abstract <p>Since I've chosen a very contemporary and relatively unexamined author as the subject of my thesis, I'd like to make a few comments here about why I think Nichols' work deserves attention. One of my minor reasons is what I've just stated--Nichols is a very contemporary, relatively unexamined author. Much of the criticism in current literary journals suggests that with a few exceptions--notably Updike, Cheever, and Bellow--American literature declined significantly after the late 1940s; these journals further suggest that many writers who are currently producing fiction are merely popular writers. I don't necessarily disagree with the standard conception of "modern" American literature's Holy Trinity (Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway), nor do I wish to wrestle with the question of what characteristics condemn a writer's works to the realm of mere popularity; I suggest only that one writer who is writing about important issues of concern at this very moment should get some attention before his case is assigned to the overcrowded, slow-moving court of posterity. It's not very comforting to think that thirty or forty years from now someone living in Taos, by then a suburb of Albuquerque with a population of one or two million, may come across Nichols' work and say, "You know, he's got something there."</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/rtd/25/
dc.identifier.articleid 1028
dc.identifier.contextkey 3844900
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-5531
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath rtd/25
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/74059
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/rtd/25/1980_HedbergSL_MythProgressWork.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 22:55:25 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines American Literature
dc.subject.disciplines Literature in English, North America
dc.title The myth of progress in the works of John Nichols
dc.type article
dc.type.genre thesis
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication a7f2ac65-89b1-4c12-b0c2-b9bb01dd641b
thesis.degree.level thesis
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
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