Role profiles: an alternative look at personality in couples therapy

Date
2007-01-01
Authors
Cheon, Hee-Sun
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Ronald J. Werner-Wilson
Marcia L. Michaels
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Human Development and Family Studies
Abstract

The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it aimed to test the recently developed personality assessment, Role Profiles, for its validity in the form of convergent validity analysis and cross structure analysis guided by role theory in which Role Profiles is grounded. Second, this study explored Role Profiles' clinical implications by capturing participants' subjective experiences of this assessment.;Twenty couples recruited from the community completed the assessments, which included the Demographic Information form, the Rosenberg's Self-Esteem scale, the Dyadic Adjustment scale, and the Role Balance scale. Upon completion of the assessments, participants were asked to complete the Role Profiles by placing seventy-one cards of roles in one of four groups that best described how they felt about themselves at that moment. Four groups included "This Is Who I Am", "This Is Who I Am Not", "I Am Not Sure If This Is Who I Am", and "This Is Who I Want To Be". After the assessments, the couples were asked to answer two sets of open-ended questions about their subjective experiences of the Role Profiles.;Findings of this study were consistent with previous studies on couples similarity and marital satisfaction: couples who shared many identical roles in their roles profiles were more likely to report higher satisfaction in their marriage. Furthermore, this study found a negative relationship between role confusion and self-esteem. Additionally, the results of this study indicated a statistically significant negative relationship between role confusion and marital satisfaction for husbands but not wives. The utility of the Role Profiles as a clinical assessment in couples therapy are discussed and suggested are made for future research.

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