Numerical Investigations of Bio-Inspired Blade Designs to Reduce Broadband Noise in Aircraft Engines and Wind Turbines

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2017-01-01
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Bodling, Andrew
Agrawal, Bharat
Clark, Ian
Alexander, W. Nathan
Devenport, William
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Sharma, Anupam
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Aerospace Engineering

The Department of Aerospace Engineering seeks to instruct the design, analysis, testing, and operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, or space, including studies of aerodynamics, structure mechanics, propulsion, and the like.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering was organized as the Department of Aeronautical Engineering in 1942. Its name was changed to the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1961. In 1990, the department absorbed the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and became the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In 2003 the name was changed back to the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

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1942-present

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  • Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics (1990-2003)

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Abstract

This paper numerically models an airfoil geometry inspired by the downy coat of the barn owl and contrasts its aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance with the baseline airfoil. Implicit large eddy simulations are performed with the Navier Stokes solver FDL3DI. A baseline NACA 0012 airfoil is compared against the same model with an array of fences at the trailing edge. Both models were simulated at a Reynolds number of 3 × 105, flow mach number of 0.2 and angle of attack of 3 degrees.

The fences are shown to reduce the sound spectra in the high frequencies by up to 1.8 dB at the airfoil trailing edge. Spanwise correlations show a reduction in coherence length, especially at low frequencies, with the fences. The simulation results agree with the experiments in that the fence spacing is an important design parameter.

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This is a manuscript of a proceeding published as Bodling, Andrew, Bharat R. Agrawal, Anupam Sharma, Ian Clark, William N. Alexander, and William J. Devenport. 2017. "Numerical Investigations of Bio-Inspired Blade Designs to Reduce Broadband Noise in Aircraft Engines and Wind Turbines." 55th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, AIAA SciTech Forum, (AIAA 2017-0458). DOI: 10.2514/6.2017-0458. Posted with permission.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017