Sublimation inside an Elastoplastic Material

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2008-10-03
Authors
Levitas, Valery
Altukhova, Nataliya
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Aerospace Engineering

The Department of Aerospace Engineering seeks to instruct the design, analysis, testing, and operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, or space, including studies of aerodynamics, structure mechanics, propulsion, and the like.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering was organized as the Department of Aeronautical Engineering in 1942. Its name was changed to the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1961. In 1990, the department absorbed the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and became the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In 2003 the name was changed back to the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

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1942-present

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  • Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics (1990-2003)

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Abstract

Thermodynamic and kinetic approaches for sublimation inside elastoplastic material under tensile stress are developed for large strains. Various conceptual problems related to irreversible plastic deformation are addressed for a spherical bubble. They include definitions of the thermodynamic driving forces and activation energies, nontraditional concepts of a critical nucleus, path dependence of its appearance, modes of its growth (sublimation or expansion due to loss of mechanical stability), and the possibility of reverse transformation. The kinetic relationships between sublimation pressure and temperature are obtained.

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This article is from Physical Review Letters 101 (2008): 145703, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.145703. Posted with permission.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2008
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