The Structure of Wages and Benefits in the U.S. Pork Industry

Date
1999-02-01
Authors
Hurley, Terrance
Kliebenstein, James
Orazem, Peter
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Economics
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Economics
Abstract

Pork production has evolved from relatively small, family-run operations toward large-scale operations with several employees. Important questions about the structure of compensation in this rapidly changing labor market are answered using probit and ordered probit models and data from a national survey of pork producers and their employees. The results suggest (i) the structure of wages in pork production is consistent with more developed labor markets; (ii) employees earn a wage premium for using advanced technology and working in larger operations; and (iii) employees are willing to accept lower wages in exchange for better benefits and working con- ditions.

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This is a staff paper of an article from American Journal of Agricultural Economics 81 (1999): 144, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1244457.

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