Osajin and Pomiferin, Two Isoflavones Purified from Osage Orange Fruits, Tested for Repellency to the Maize Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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2000-12-01
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Peterson, Chris
Fristad, Anne
Tsao, Rong
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Coats, Joel
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Entomology

The Department of Entomology seeks to teach the study of insects, their life-cycles, and the practicalities in dealing with them, for use in the fields of business, industry, education, and public health. The study of entomology can be applied towards evolution and ecological sciences, and insects’ relationships with other organisms & humans, or towards an agricultural or horticultural focus, focusing more on pest-control and management.

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The Department of Entomology was founded in 1975 as a result of the division of the Department of Zoology and Entomology.

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Abstract

The fruit of the osage orange tree, Maclura pomifera (Raf.) Schneid (Moraceae), has long been thought to be repellent to insects. A preliminary study reported here confirmed repellency of fruit extracts to the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky. Two isoflavones, osajin and pomiferin, were isolated from the mature fruit of M. pomifera in high purity (≥95%). Testing of purified osajin and pomiferin failed to show repellency. Repellency is likely caused by factors other than isoflavones in the fruit.

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This article is from Environmental Entomology 29 (2000): 1133, doi:10.1603/0046-225X-29.6.1133. Posted with permission.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2000
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