The private conversion of a public man: Timeless presence and disparate linking in T.S. Eliot's poetry

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2012-01-01
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Albertson, Natalie
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KJ Gilchrist
Barbara Ching
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This essay explores the way incarnation allows T.S. Eliot to renegotiate and redistribute themes of time, age, life, and death from his pre-conversion to post-conversion poetry. The incarnation, especially its dispensation of time, is a paramount part of Eliot's conversion. I posit that incarnation drove Eliot to Christianity because incarnation represents a divine disruption of time. This disruption bridges time and timelessness, here and there ,and life and death. Eliot's eventual rest in the Chalcedonian form of incarnation, therefore, provides a resolution of and not a divergence from his poetry previous to his conversion.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012