The role of ceramic and glass science research in meeting societal challenges: Report from an NSF-sponsored workshop

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2017-05-01
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Faber, Katherine
Martin, Steve
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Martin, Steve
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Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

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Materials Science and Engineering
Materials engineers create new materials and improve existing materials. Everything is limited by the materials that are used to produce it. Materials engineers understand the relationship between the properties of a material and its internal structure — from the macro level down to the atomic level. The better the materials, the better the end result — it’s as simple as that.
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Ames National LaboratoryMaterials Science and Engineering
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Under the sponsorship of the U.S. National Science Foundation, a workshop on emerging research opportunities in ceramic and glass science was held in September 2016. Reported here are proceedings of the workshop. The report details eight challenges identified through workshop discussions: Ceramic processing: Programmable design and assembly; The defect genome: Understanding, characterizing, and predicting defects across time and length scales; Functionalizing defects for unprecedented properties; Ceramic flatlands: Defining structure-property relations in free-standing, supported, and confined two-dimensional ceramics; Ceramics in the extreme: Discovery and design strategies; Ceramics in the extreme: Behavior of multimaterial systems; Understanding and exploiting glasses and melts under extreme conditions; and Rational design of functional glasses guided by predictive modeling. It is anticipated that these challenges, once met, will promote basic understanding and ultimately enable advancements within multiple sectors, including energy, environment, manufacturing, security, and health care.

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This article is published as Faber, Katherine T., Tewodros Asefa, Monika Backhaus‐Ricoult, Richard Brow, Julia Y. Chan, Shen Dillon, William G. Fahrenholtz et al. "The role of ceramic and glass science research in meeting societal challenges: Report from an NSF‐sponsored workshop." Journal of the American Ceramic Society 100, no. 5 (2017): 1777-1803. doi: 10.1111/jace.14881. Posted with permission.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017
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