Long-term marriage conflict and longevity strategies over the life span: a qualitative study

Thumbnail Image
Date
1996
Authors
Simanski, Julia
Major Professor
Advisor
Joyce M. Mercier
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

Related Units

  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Human Development and Family Studies
Abstract

The study is an exploratory, qualitative study investigating the frequency, sources, and resolution strategies of conflict in long-term marriages. In addition, keys to an enduring marriage were explored. Fifteen couples married over 50 years or more were interviewed using an unstructured question format. The life graph was another methodological tool used to help couples recall major life events and give perspective to their married lives. Direct quotations of the respondents illustrated the findings. Couples' perceptions of major life events were similar, yet recalled primarily in relation to their roles within the marriage as either caretaker or provider. Marital conflict throughout the life span was reported as minimal, and most couples avoided conflict rather than actively engaging in it. Respect and commitment were major contributors to marital longevity. Gender differences and period effects greatly affected spouses' perceptions of conflict and marital life.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Copyright
Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1996