Strain, negative emotional affect, and the criminal adaptations of women

Date
2007-01-01
Authors
Lair, Audrey
Major Professor
Advisor
Andrew L. Hochstetler
Gloria Jones-Johnson
Frederick O. Lorenz
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Sociology
Organizational Unit
Journal Issue
Series
Department
Sociology
Abstract

This study explores the capacity of Agnew's General Strain Theory to explain the self-reported criminality of women. Using a sample of chemically addicted women, this research examines how strains with special relevance for women---losing custody of a child, homelessness, being a victim of assault, suffering from female related health problems, and getting a positive HIV diagnosis, can accumulate and lead to criminal behavior. It also explores the mediating effects of negative emotions and anger in the strain-crime relationship.;The results reveal that exposure to a greater number of strains increases the likelihood of criminal behavior. They also reveal that race and ethnicity conditions the mediating effects of anger and negative emotions. The results are discussed in light of General Strain Theory and its importance for studying crime among women.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source