Quantitative risk assessment of human salmonellosis through consumption of pork in Belgium: a modular risk model

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2007-01-01
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Grijspeerdt, K.
Messens, W.
Bollaerts, Kaatje
van Dessel, P.
Delhalle, L.
Maes, Dominiek
Boone, Ides
Mintiens, K.
Mintiens, K.
Mintiens, K.
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International Conference on the Epidemiology and Control of Biological, Chemical and Physical Hazards in Pigs and Pork
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The SafePork conference series began in 1996 to bring together international researchers, industry, and government agencies to discuss current Salmonella research and identify research needs pertaining to both pig and pork production. In subsequent years topics of research presented at these conferences expanded to include other chemical and biological hazards to pig and pork production.

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As Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) is the major source of human salmonellosis in Belgium, a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to evaluate the health risks associated with the consumption of minced pork meat contaminated with STM in Belgium was initiated. The QMRA model describes the chain from farm-to-fork, dividing the exposure pathway into several modules (1) primary production, (2) transport & holding, (3) slaughter & processing, (4) distribution & storage and (5) consumer. Both fresh and frozen minced meat products prepared at home are considered and human illness is estimated for both inadequately cooking and cross-contamination during preparation. Data relevant to the Belgian situation was incorporated into the model where available, international and literature data was used otherwise. First baseline results of the model are presented and the impact of some scenarios was investigated. These first results show that there seems to be more potential in reducing the STM load on the carcasses, rather then reducing the prevalence.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007