Gender Differences in the Relationship of Peer Pressure and Emotional Regulation with Antisocial Behaviors

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2014-04-15
Authors
Su, Zhihan
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Altmetrics
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Psychology
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Psychology
Abstract

A number of past studies have demonstrated gender differences in mean levels of aggression and antisocial behavior (Archer, 2000; Green et al., 2008) as well as gender differences in mean levels peer pressure (Fagan et al., 2007), suggesting that men engage in antisocial behaviors more frequently and also experience higher levels of peer pressure. However, based on the predictions of the General Aggression Model (Anderson & Bushman, 2002), the underlying relationships between different risk factors and antisocial behavior are expected be equal for men and women because they are based on universal learning processes. Therefore, we expected that peer pressure would predict antisocial behavior both for men and for women. However, we expected that peer pressure would predict more severe antisocial behaviors among men (e.g. destruction of property) and less severe antisocial behaviors among women (e.g. relational aggression and bullying). These differences are likely to be a result of the restriction in range of the antisocial behaviors women engage in (Archer, 2000; Green et al., 2008).

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