Finger Tapping and Parkinson's disease: Patient Quality of Life

Date
2015-04-14
Authors
Freiburger, Jaime
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Altmetrics
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Kinesiology
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Kinesiology
Abstract

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) demonstrate impairments in repetitive finger movements. Performance of these fingers movements is characterized by increased movement rate, reduced movement amplitude, and hesitations. Clinically, physicians evaluate repetitive finger movement performance to assess disease severity and progression. However, to date, no study has examined how repetitive finger movement impairment relates to patient quality of life in persons PD. For this study, 68 participants completed a repetitive finger tapping task and the Parkinson’s disease questionnaire (PDQ- 39) to assess quality of life. Results revealed that participants that demonstrated greater impairments in repetitive finger movement (increased movement rate and decreased movement amplitude) had reduced quality of life (greater PDQ-39 scores). Thus, evaluation of repetitive finger movements may be a valuable tool to assess multiple domains of Parkinson’s disease, from both the physician and patient perspective.

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