Ecology and diversity of culturable fungal species associated with soybean seedling diseases in the Midwestern United States

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2022
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Pimentel, Mirian F.
Srour, Ali Y.
Warner, Amanda J.
Bond, Jason P.
Bradley, Carl A.
Rupe, John
Chilvers, Martin I.
Rojas, J. Alejandro
Jacobs, Janette L.
Little, Christopher R.
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Robertson, Alison
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Plant Pathology and Microbiology
The Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology and the Department of Entomology officially merged as of September 1, 2022. The new department is known as the Department of Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Microbiology (PPEM). The overall mission of the Department is to benefit society through research, teaching, and extension activities that improve pest management and prevent disease. Collectively, the Department consists of about 100 faculty, staff, and students who are engaged in research, teaching, and extension activities that are central to the mission of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Department possesses state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities in the Advanced Research and Teaching Building and in Science II. In addition, research and extension activities are performed off-campus at the Field Extension Education Laboratory, the Horticulture Station, the Agriculture Engineering/Agronomy Farm, and several Research and Demonstration Farms located around the state. Furthermore, the Department houses the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic, the Iowa Soybean Research Center, the Insect Zoo, and BugGuide. Several USDA-ARS scientists are also affiliated with the Department.
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Plant Pathology and Microbiology
Abstract
Aims: To isolate and characterize fungi associated with diseased soybean seedlings in Midwestern soybean production fields and to determine the influence of environmental and edaphic factors on their incidence. Methods and Results: Seedlings were collected from fields with seedling disease history in 2012 and 2013 for fungal isolation. Environmental and edaphic data associated with each field was collected. 3036 fungal isolates were obtained and assigned to 76 species. The most abundant genera recovered were Fusarium (73%) and Trichoderma (11.2%). Other genera included Mortierella, Clonostachys, Rhizoctonia, Alternaria, Mucor, Phoma, Macrophomina and Phomopsis. Most recovered species are known soybean pathogens. However, non-pathogenic organisms were also isolated. Crop history, soil density, water source, precipitation and temperature were the main factors influencing the abundance of fungal species. Conclusion: Key fungal species associated with soybean seedling diseases occurring in several US production regions were characterized. This work also identified major environment and edaphic factors affecting the abundance and occurrence of these species. Significance and Impact of the Study: The identification and characterization of the main pathogens associated with seedling diseases across major soybean-producing areas could help manage those pathogens, and devise more effective and sustainable practices to reduce the damage they cause.
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This article is published as Pimentel, Mirian F., Ali Y. Srour, Amanda J. Warner, Jason P. Bond, Carl A. Bradley, John Rupe, Martin I. Chilvers et al. "Ecology and Diversity of Culturable Fungal Species Associated with Soybean Seedling Diseases in the Midwestern United States." Journal of Applied Microbiology (2022). doi:10.1111/jam.15507. Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.
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