Change in attachment of pathogenic bacteria to decontaminated pig carcasses

Date
2009-01-01
Authors
Krag, R.
Olsen, J.
Aabo, Søren
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Abstract

Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes are food born human pathogenic bacteria, which are associated with consumption of raw pork. At the slaughterhouses decontamination of the pig carcasses has shown to be effective to reduce the number of pathogenic bacteria and may improve food safety. However, decontamination could change the meat surface properties, and thereby also the ability of bacteria to attach, with a potential impact on cross- and recontamination during handling at slaughterhouses and at meat processing. The purpose of the study was to investigate the attachment of Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogens to surfaces of pig skin and muscle after decontamination with 80°C water or 55°C 1% lactic acid. Loosely attached bacteria were removed by irrigation, and the number of firmly attached bacteria was counted after detachment by swabbing and stomaching.

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