Location, location, location: place-specific human capital, rural firm entry and firm survival

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2018-02-23
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

A majority of economic development programs in the U.S. are aimed at creating jobs; and a growing subset of the funds are allocated to achieving that objective by attracting and creating new firms1. According to a recent Kauffman Foundation report, young firms (those less than 5 years old) account for the vast majority of net new job creation in the U.S. (Wiens and Jackson, 2014). But the empirical reality is that one-third of new start-ups fail within two years of opening and two-thirds exit by their sixth year . The exit rates in table 1 illustrate another common finding demonstrated by Yu et al (2011): that rural firms exit at slower rates than urban firms.

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This is a draft chapter/article. The final version is available in Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes: Implications for Regions and Industries edited by C Karlsson, A. Cornett, and T. Wallin, eds, published in 2018, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd
https://doi.org/10.4337/9781786432483.00015.

The material cannot be used for any other purpose without further permission of the publisher, and is for private use only.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018
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