The Whole is Greater than the Sum: An Empirical Analysis of the Effect of Team Based Learning on Student Achievement

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2016-01-01
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Jacobs, Keri
Boessen, Christian
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

We examine whether teams exert a positive influence on student test scores in three Team Based Learning (TBL) courses at two different universities. We find positive and significant effects on individual exam scores for students at all levels of the ability distribution; on average, an individual’s exam score increases roughly 6 points for every 10 point increase in their teammates’ average score. In addition, we find that these positive effects vary little across the ability distribution of teams and individuals, suggesting that the TBL method benefits a continuum of student abilities.

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This is a manuscript of a forthcoming article from NACTA Journal (2016). Posted with permission.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2016
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