Post-weaning Failure to Thrive in Pigs is Associated with Increased Organ Weights and Possible Anemia, but not Changes in Intestinal Function

dc.contributor.author Jones, Cassandra
dc.contributor.author Patience, John
dc.contributor.author Patience, John
dc.contributor.author Gabler, Nicholas
dc.date 2018-08-25T18:52:19.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-29T23:34:06Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-29T23:34:06Z
dc.date.copyright Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012
dc.date.issued 2012-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>A total of 96 weanling barrows were utilized in a 27 d experiment to determine the effects of post-weaning failure to thrive (PFTS) on organ weight, blood chemistry, and small intestine physiology and function. Thirty-two pigs from each of the lightest, median, and heaviest weight categories at weaning were placed in individual metabolism cages and allowed ad libitum access to water and a common nursery diet. After a 5 d acclimation period, growth rate was evaluated for 27 d. Pigs with ADG that were below two standard deviations from the mean were termed pigs with PFTS (n = 4). All other pigs were considered normal contemporaries. After the 27 d experiment, pigs were fasted overnight and humanely euthanized. Organs were emptied of digesta and weighed, blood was collected for analysis in a complete blood panel and white blood cell differential, and ileal samples taken for morphology and absorptive capacity analyses. Pigs with PFTS had increased (P < 0.02) stomach, intestine, kidney, and liver weights relative to body size. Additionally, PFTS pigs had decreased (P < 0.05) hemoglobin hematocrit, albumin, sodium, and anion gap concentrations, suggesting either anemia or increased dehydration compared to normal pigs. Finally, PFTS was associated with increased ileal villous crypt depth (P < 0.0001), but not with villous height or differences in absorptive capacity of various glucose or amino acids. These data suggest that pigs with PFTS may have a higher maintenance cost due to increased organ weight and a possible anemia or imbalance of blood chemistry. However, differences in post-weaning performance do not appear to affect small intestine function.</p>
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/ans_air/vol658/iss1/66/
dc.identifier.articleid 1772
dc.identifier.contextkey 3410204
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.31274/ans_air-180814-978
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath ans_air/vol658/iss1/66
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/8906
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Animal Science Research Reports
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/ans_air/vol658/iss1/66/R2734.pdf|||Sat Jan 15 01:24:57 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Agriculture
dc.subject.disciplines Animal Sciences
dc.subject.keywords ASL R2734
dc.title Post-weaning Failure to Thrive in Pigs is Associated with Increased Organ Weights and Possible Anemia, but not Changes in Intestinal Function
dc.type article
dc.type.genre swine
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication 5888d61a-1b3d-48c9-ab84-deb63aa3a43c
relation.isJournalIssueOfPublication 6dc63976-6a4a-4b75-a79f-e40937b79e61
relation.isSeriesOfPublication 7f3839b7-b833-4418-a6fa-adda2b23950a
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