Realism in Contemporary Afro-Hispanic Drama

dc.contributor.author Rizo, Elisa
dc.contributor.author Rizo, Elisa
dc.contributor.department World Languages and Cultures
dc.date 2018-02-17T22:23:03.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T05:46:24Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T05:46:24Z
dc.date.copyright Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2015
dc.date.issued 2015-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>Contemporary Afro-Hispanic drama offers a breadth of images that at first might be judged unrelated. 1 Take, for instance, the Afro-Uruguayan families evicted from their homes in Jorge Emilio Cardoso’s El desalojo en la calle de los negros (The Eviction on the Street of the Black People, 1992); the Costa Rican mestizo of humble origins trying to scale the social ladder while confronting a greedy oligarch in Quince Duncan’s El trepasolo (The Lone Climber, 1993); 2 or the Equatorial Guinean people trying to sort out the capricious rules imposed by a dictatorial regime in Juan Tomas Avila Laurel’s Los hombres domésticos (Homeboys, 1992).3 When seen together, such images provide a thematic spectrum that cuts across discourses of identity, geographic locations, and specific local circumstances. Yet, these dramas engage in a specific mode of analytical poetics that are rooted in the oral and written traditions of the African diaspora and that convey a twofold message of solidarity and solutions to problems. Through the examination of the above-mentioned plays, I submit that Afro-Hispanic drama published during and after the 1990s conveys a highly analytical form of realist depiction. While this realism is in alignment with previous models of aesthetic representation put forward by Hispanic intellectuals of African descent, contemporary Afro-Hispanic realist drama is also characterized by transethnic and transnational outlooks, that is, by a cosmopolitan perspective that corresponds to the globalized context in which these works were produced.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This is a manuscript of a chapter from Black Writing, Culture, and the State in Latin America, Jerome Branche (ed.) University of Vanderbilt Press, 2015. 83-102. Posted with permission.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/language_pubs/110/
dc.identifier.articleid 1110
dc.identifier.contextkey 9201825
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath language_pubs/110
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/52632
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/language_pubs/110/0-Vanderbilt_University_Press.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 18:39:58 UTC 2022
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/language_pubs/110/2015_Rizo_BlackWriting.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 18:39:59 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Latin American Languages and Societies
dc.subject.disciplines Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures
dc.subject.disciplines Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies
dc.title Realism in Contemporary Afro-Hispanic Drama
dc.type article
dc.type.genre book_chapter
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication c5500cb8-bc90-4946-b82c-024c5e62580f
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 4e087c74-bc10-4dbe-8ba0-d49bd574c6cc
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