Immobile Water Content and Mass Exchange Coefficient of a Field Soil

Thumbnail Image
Date
1997
Authors
Casey, F.X.M.
Logsdon, S.
Jaynes, Dan
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Horton, Robert
Distinguished Professor
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

Dates of Existence
1902–present

Historical Names

  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

Determining the preferential flow characteristics of a soil is important because agrichemicals can contaminate groundwater via preferential flow pathways. A model that predicts solute transport due to preferential flow is the mobile-immobile solute transport model, which partitions the total water content (θ, m3 m−3) into a mobile fraction (θm) and an immobile fraction (θim). Recently, an in situ method was proposed for determining the mobile-immobile model parameters of θim and mass exchange coefficient (α) between the fractions by using a tension infiltrometer to apply a series of four fluorobenzoate tracers. The objective of this study was to test the in situ technique at 47 sites along a transect in a ridge-till corn (Zea mays L.) field of Nicollet soil (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Aquic Hapludoll). The immobile fraction (θim /θ) ranged from 0.394 to 0.952 with a median of 0.622. The mass exchange coefficient ranged from 0.000237 to 0.00481 min−1 with a median of 0.00123 min−1. These values are similar in magnitude and range to values reported by other investigators, and they follow the same relationships. The values of θim/θ and α along the transect indicated no obvious spatial trends or spatial correlations. Significant linear correlations did exist between α and soil water flux, α and θim, and θ and θim.

Comments

This article is published as Casey, F. X. M., R. Horton, S. D. Logsdon, and D. B. Jaynes. "Immobile water content and mass exchange coefficient of a field soil." Soil Science Society of America Journal 61, no. 4 (1997): 1030-1036. Doi: 10.2136/sssaj1997.03615995006100040006x

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Copyright
Collections