The Allocation of Nutrient Load Reduction across a Watershed: Assessing Delivery Coefficients as an Implementation Tool

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2006-03-01
Authors
Jha, Manoj
Gassman, Philip
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Feng, Hongli
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Delivery coefficients have long been used in economic analysis of policies that seek to address environmental problems like water pollution (Montgomery, 1972). However, the derivation and validity of delivery coefficients have not been examined carefully by empirical analyses. In this study, we derived estimates of delivery coefficients and then evaluated them as a bridge between complex biophysical models and economic policies. Specifically, delivery coefficients were first derived for the effects of nitrogen application reduction based on the simulation results of a watershed based model, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Nutrient load reduction responsibilities were then allocated to subwatersheds based on the delivery coefficients using four different allocation principles. We found that the allocations based on delivery coefficients achieved results that differed from the water quality goals by only a few percentage points in general. Moreover, our results indicated that potential cost savings, measured in percentages, outweighed the deviation from water quality goals.

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