Beyond single domains: Writing in boundary crossing

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2014-01-01
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Oakey, David
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Russell, David
Professor Emeritus
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

The chapter explains the role of text production in intellectual, cultural, and social mobility in a digital age. Written communication is becoming increasingly important across the domains, where in order to produce text people must cross boundaries which are encountered neither during habitual practices of text production nor during formal education. The three boundary-crossings the chapter focuses on are (1) crossing professional domains through multi/inter/transdisciplinary text production, primarily in research settings, (2) crossing geographic frontiers through the globalization of education and work, and (3) crossing professional boundaries through personal career transitions due to unexpected changes. (This is in contrast to the studies of “lifelong learning” discussed in Poe and Scott, this volume.) The chapter emphasizes the newness of studies of boundary crossing and discusses the difficulties in formulating such studies, not least because the boundaries themselves are not totally fixed. We then outline the various theories, methods, and ideological orientations that have thus far informed boundary-crossing studies, the challenges that their problems and methods pose to applied linguistics, and some of the research needed.

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Published as Oakey, David, and David R. Russell. "21 Beyond single domains: Writing in boundary crossing." Handbook of Writing and Text Production 10 (2014): 385. Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2014
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