An intronic structure enabled by a long-distance interaction serves as a novel target for splicing correction in spinal muscular atrophy

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2013-01-01
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Singh, Natalia
Lawler, Mariah
Upreti, Daya
Kaczynski, Jennifer
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Singh, Ravindra
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Ottesen, Eric
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Biomedical Sciences

The Department of Biomedical Sciences aims to provide knowledge of anatomy and physiology in order to understand the mechanisms and treatment of animal diseases. Additionally, it seeks to teach the understanding of drug-action for rational drug-therapy, as well as toxicology, pharmacodynamics, and clinical drug administration.

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The Department of Biomedical Sciences was formed in 1999 as a merger of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology.

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1999–present

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  • College of Veterinary Medicine (parent college)
  • Department of Veterinary Anatomy (predecessor, 1997)
  • Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (predecessor, 1997)

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Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

The Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology was founded to give students an understanding of life principles through the understanding of chemical and physical principles. Among these principles are frontiers of biotechnology such as metabolic networking, the structure of hormones and proteins, genomics, and the like.

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The Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics was founded in 1959, and was administered by the College of Sciences and Humanities (later, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences). In 1979 it became co-administered by the Department of Agriculture (later, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). In 1998 its name changed to the Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology.

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1959–present

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  • Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (1959–1998)

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Abstract

Here, we report a long-distance interaction (LDI) as a critical regulator of alternative splicing of Survival Motor Neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7, skipping of which is linked to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic disease of children and infants. We show that this LDI is linked to a unique intra-intronic structure that we term internal stem through LDI-1 (ISTL1). We used site-specific mutations and Selective 2′-Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension to confirm the formation and functional significance of ISTL1. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of ISTL1 is independent of hnRNP A1/A2B1 and PTB1 previously implicated in SMN2 exon 7 splicing. We show that an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated sequestration of the 3′ strand of ISTL1 fully corrects SMN2 exon 7 splicing and restores high levels of SMN and Gemin2, a SMN-interacting protein, in SMA patient cells. Our results also reveal that the 3′ strand of ISTL1 and upstream sequences constitute an inhibitory region that we term intronic splicing silencer N2 (ISS-N2). This is the first report to demonstrate a critical role of a structure-associated LDI in splicing regulation of an essential gene linked to a genetic disease. Our findings expand the repertoire of potential targets for an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated therapy of SMA.

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This is an article from Nucleic Acids Research 41 (2013): 8144, doi:10.1093/nar/gkt609. Posted with permission.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2013
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