Water−Benzene Interactions: An Effective Fragment Potential and Correlated Quantum Chemistry Study

Thumbnail Image
Supplemental Files
Date
2009-01-01
Authors
Slipchenko, Lyudmila
Gordon, Mark
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

Organizational Unit
Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry seeks to provide students with a foundation in the fundamentals and application of chemical theories and processes of the lab. Thus prepared they me pursue careers as teachers, industry supervisors, or research chemists in a variety of domains (governmental, academic, etc).

History
The Department of Chemistry was founded in 1880.

Dates of Existence
1880-present

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Abstract

Structures and binding in small water−benzene complexes (1−8 water molecules and 1−2 benzene molecules) are studied using the general effective fragment potential (EFP) method. The lowest energy conformers of the clusters were found using a Monte Carlo technique. The binding energies in the smallest clusters (dimers, trimers, and tetramers) were also evaluated with second order perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)). The EFP method accurately predicts structures and binding energies in the water−benzene complexes. Benzene is polarizable and consequently participates in hydrogen bond networking of water. Since the water−benzene interactions are only slightly weaker than water−water interactions, structures with different numbers of water−water, benzene−water, and benzene−benzene bonds often have very similar binding energies. This is a challenge for computational methods.

Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Journal of Physical Chemistry A (113 (2009): 2092, doi:10.1021/jp808845b. Copyright 2009 American Chemical Society.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Subject Categories
Copyright
Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009
Collections