The Economics of Obesity-Related Mortality Among High Income Countries

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2006-01-01
Authors
Tegene, Abebayehu
Rickertsen, Kyrre
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Huffman, Sonya
Adjunct Associate Professor Emeritus
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Health production and supply functions based on models for productive households are established. Data for 18 high income countries over 1971-2001 are used in the empirical analysis. In the health production function, mortality from cardiovascular diseases and diabetes is positively related to inputs of calories and sweeteners but not to input of fat or to national health care. In the health supply function, a high real price of food, real wage rate and non-labor income, a modest level of socialized medicine, and a low labor force participation rate decrease mortality. A cheap food policy erodes gains from reduced smoking and better treatments for high cholesterol levels and hypertension that have occurred over the last three decades.

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