Construct definition and validity inquiry in SLA research

Thumbnail Image
Supplemental Files
Date
1999
Authors
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Chapelle, Carol
Distinguished Professor
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

History
The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

Dates of Existence
1939-present

Historical Names

  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

In second language acquisition (SLA) research, some form of measurement is frequently used to produce empirical evidence for hypotheses about the nature and development of communicative competence. For example, SLA researchers test learners to investigate such aspects of interlanguage vocabulary1 as the acquisition of semantic (Kellerman 1978) and syntactic (Ard & Gass 1987) features of words, the structure of the L2 lexicon (Meara 1984; Singleton & Little 1991 ), lexicon size (Nation 1993), strategies associated with vocabulary use (Blum-Kulka & Levinson 1983), and automaticity of lexical access (Chitiri, Sun, Willows, and Taylor 1992). Tests are used for investigating vocabulary, as well as for SLA research in general, to elicit learners' performance in a defined context. In other words, taking the complement to Douglas's (Chapter 6, this volume) view of language tests as SLA elicitation devices, I consider SLA elicitation devices from the perspective of two principles that underlie language testing: construct definition and validation.

Comments

This is a book chapter from Interfaces between Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing Research (1999): 32. Posted with permission.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Copyright
Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1999
Collections