Modeling Intermediary Satisfaction with Mandatory Adoption of E-government Technologies for Food Distribution

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2016-04-01
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Chopra, Shweta
Rajan, Prashant
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

History
The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

Dates of Existence
1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

We report quantitative measures of factors that influence technology acceptance among intermediaries delivering government-supplied essential commodities to citizens in Chhattisgarh, India. Using the method of partial least squares, we validate and extend the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, finding evidence for the effect of social influence, performance expectancy, and effort expectancy on salespersons’ satisfaction with the adoption of point-of-sale machines mandated by the Chhattisgarh government. Further, the moderating effects of age, experience with technology, work experience, and educational attainment on the factors that influence satisfaction are assessed. Key recommendations are drawn for research and practice on intermediation in e-government.

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This article is from Information Technologies & International Development 12 (2016): 5–34. Posted with permission.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2016
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